Collins urges Windstream to provide increased access to rural broadband

Press Release, State & National
Windstream

GAINESVILLE, Ga. — Reps. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), Austin Scott (R-Ga.), and Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.) today sent a letter to Windstream underscoring the importance of providing increased access to broadband – particularly in rural areas – in the midst of COVID-19.

“As representatives of thousands of Windstream customers, we write today regarding the impact coronavirus has had on broadband access in rural communities throughout Georgia,” they wrote. “In the past, we have written to you regarding the inadequate internet service our constituents are receiving despite your company’s acceptance of federal dollars to expand access. While we know Windstream has upgraded some areas that are more populated and less rural, many of our constituents continue to struggle with poor broadband speeds.”

For years, Windstream customers across Georgia have consistently struggled to gain access to reliable broadband speeds. Congress has taken significant steps toward expanding rural broadband infrastructure in recent years, including securing federal funding to providers in rural areas. However, some carriers – like Windstream – have failed to provide adequate broadband speeds to consumers despite collecting taxpayer dollars. As this pandemic is forcing more and more Georgians to rely on the internet, access to reliable broadband is more critical than ever before.

“Due to the coronavirus outbreak, thousands of Georgians are being forced to work, learn, and recreate from home. This undoubtedly has increased the strain on the networks your consumers depend upon. Over the past several years, we have heard complaints of a network that is overburdened and cannot keep up during peak use. Even though we have been calling for increased internet access in rural areas for years, this moment in time shows that Windstream has yet to meet the mark.”

Read the full letter here.

North Georgia Chairmen urge Kemp to close State Parks

Community, News
Georgia, North Georgia, Governor, Brian Kemp, State Parks, Close, Shut Down, Letter, Chairmen, Habersham, Rabun, Franklin, Towns, White, Gilmer, Dade, Fannin, Union, Lumpkin, Stephens, Banks, Travis Turner, Tim Stamey, Greg James

Blue Ridge, Ga. – Twelve Commission Chairmen from North Georgia counties have joined together and signed a letter asking Governor Brian Kemp to shut down the State Parks.

“It appears that these nonresidents believe our area is a safe haven because of its rural nature. To the contrary, the influx of people into our communities has had a staggering detrimental effect on our resources,” the letter to Kemp read in part.

Georgia, North Georgia, Governor, Brian Kemp, State Parks, Close, Shut Down, Letter, Chairmen, Habersham, Rabun, Franklin, Towns, White, Gilmer, Dade, Fannin, Union, Lumpkin, Stephens, Banks, Travis Turner, Tim Stamey, Greg James

Habersham County Commissioner District 5 Tim Stamey

The letter goes on to outline the resources in our area that have been affected by the out-of-towners looking to seclude themselves, including in these resources are food, dry goods and fuel.

It goes on to inform Kemp that our area is not equipped medically: “Our communities simply do not have enough hospital beds or medical personnel to care for the inflated population.”

Though only serving as a commissioner for a little over three months, Habersham County Commissioner District 5 Tim Stamey felt he needed to be proactive in bringing a solution to this problem: “I am a retired special operator and we don’t sit around talking about things, we get it done.”

Stamey who sits on the County Health Board said, “I’m on the County Health Board and talk to Healthcare workers in my county on a daily basis. They are the heros/heroines in all this. This virus does not spread itself on the wind.”

Moccasin Creek State Park, situated just North of Unicoi State park has been “crazy, 4th of July crazy” for the past three weekends according to Stamey, who has witnessed the impact on his county first hand.

Stamey initially contacted Rabun County Chairman Greg James and White County Chairman Travis Turner.

“I started this by just trying to get border counties on board,” Stamey said and added, “Then Chairmen were like well, did you call such and such, I know they feel the same way. It just kept getting bigger and bigger.”

Stamey said that all Commission Chairmen were helpful, on board, and taking the matter seriously: “I talked to most of them several times and for up to an hour each time.”

Stamey, along with the 12 county chairmen and many residents, is hoping that this letter will get the attention of Kemp. The letter in closing states: “On behalf of the many citizens that live in North Georgia who entrust us as County Commissioners to represent their interests, we respectfully ask you to close all of the state parks located in our area immediately.”

Georgia, North Georgia, Governor, Brian Kemp, State Parks, Close, Shut Down, Letter, Chairmen, Habersham, Rabun, Franklin, Towns, White, Gilmer, Dade, Fannin, Union, Lumpkin, Stephens, Banks, Travis Turner, Tim Stamey, Greg James

Georgia, North Georgia, Governor, Brian Kemp, State Parks, Close, Shut Down, Letter, Chairmen, Habersham, Rabun, Franklin, Towns, White, Gilmer, Dade, Fannin, Union, Lumpkin, Stephens, Banks, Travis Turner, Tim Stamey, Greg James

 

Click Here to read about National Park Closures in our area

Author

Natalie Kissel

Natalie@FetchYourNews.com

Kids are out, come to the zoo!

Community
Your kids are out of school. Are you looking for an activity for them that doesn’t expose them to large groups of people? North Georgia Zoo is the answer!

North Georgia Zoo in Cleveland, GA will be open Wednesday and Thursday, 11:00am-3:00pm BY RESERVATION ONLY. This will allow us to limit the number of people in the zoo to levels in alignment with the CDC recommendations of 50 people in close proximity to one another. Tours will be limited to 20 people. Animal Experiences will be limited to 8-10 people. The zoo is an open-air facility that is spread out over a large area, so “social distancing” is the norm here. There are also hand sanitizer stations throughout the facility for your convenience. At this time there are no confirmed COVID-19 cases in our county.

You may reserve a Wildlife Walk (tour of our exotic animals), the Petting Zoo (we have 30-40 babies in the Petting Zoo right now!), or a Hands-On Animal Experience (Wolf Experience, Otter Experience, Meet the Babies, or Fennec Fox Experience). Again, you MUST HAVE RESERVATIONS TO ATTEND EITHER OF THESE TWO DAYS.

Go to www.myfavoritezoo.com to make your reservations! North Georgia Zoo is located at 2912 Paradise Valley Road, Cleveland, GA

About North Georgia Zoo & Farm/ Wildlife Wonders:

North Georgia Zoo & Farm (NGZ) is home to over 300 animals. NGZ is known for its outreach
programs called Wildlife Wonders- Zoo to You which started in 1995. Wildlife Wonders was featured
on “Dirty Jobs” and also provides 1000’s of educational outreach programs each year. Wildlife
Wonders opened their doors for guests to come visit during the fall of 2010 and the name was
changed to North Georgia Zoo & Farm. NGZ is known as a “Zoo like no other” and “My favorite zoo”.

They have earned these titles because of the unique and hands-on experiences they offer.
Sign up for animal encounters with otters, kangaroos, wolves, zebras and more. Enjoy a reptile
encounter and get hands–on with everything from alligators to large snakes. Take a wagon ride to
see exotic livestock, learn about the rare breed livestock breeding program and feed the camels!

Guided Wildlife Walks are provided during regular business hours and offer a chance to learn more
about and get up close with animals such as Cougars, Lemurs, Monkey, Birds of Prey and many
others. The petting zoo and farm animal area is a low-cost option that is great for kids and adults
alike and introduces visitors to over a dozen different farm animal breeds plus other animals such as
giant tortoise, deer, parrots, and baby camel. Baby animals are always available to pet and feed in
the petting zoo area but come in the spring and you may even see one being born!

NGZ is licensed by Georgia Department of Natural Resources and United States Department of
Agriculture. NGZ is a member of the Zoological Association of America. NGZ has received
outstanding reviews from both zoological professionals and visitors.

NGZ offers specialty tours and animal encounters throughout the year by reservation. Zoo
Admittance is seasonal and offered on select days. To view dates, prices, options and more visit:
www.myfavoritezoo.com. To learn more about their Zoo to You program visit: www.azootoyou.com.

Flood watch in effect for much of north Georgia

News

PEACHTREE CITY, Ga. – A flood watch remains in effect today (Mon Feb 10) through Tuesday evening for much of north Georgia, including the following counties:Dawson-Lumpkin-White-Dade-Walker-Catoosa-Whitfield-Murray-Fannin-Gilmer-Union-Towns-Chattooga-Gordon-Pickens-White-Floyd-Bartow-Cherokee-Forsyth-Hall-Banks-Jackson-Madison-Polk-Paulding-Cobb-North Fulton-Gwinnett-Barrow-Clarke-Oconee-Haralson-Carroll-Douglas-South Fulton-DeKalb-Rockdale-Walton-Clayton-Including the cities of Calhoun, Dahlonega, Cleveland, Rome, Cartersville, Gainesville, Marietta, Atlanta, Lawrenceville, Athens, Carrollton, Douglasville, East Point, Decatur and Conyers.

Ask the Doc! Chemo Recovery and the Flu shot Conspiracy

FYNTV, Health
ask the doc

Ask the Doc returns as Dr. William Whaley discusses with Guest host Rick about Chemo treatment recovery and the flu shot conspiracies.

Turfgrass Research Field Day is Thursday, August 9

Outdoors

By:  Eddie Ayers, County Extension Agent

Whether you’re a new, beginner or veteran homeowner, landscaper (perhaps your own company) or golf course superintendent, you’ll find the latest research-based information on growing and maintaining Turfgrass at this year’s Turfgrass Research Field Day on the UGA campus in Griffin, GA on Thursday, August 9th.

The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) researchers and UGA Extension specialists will present the latest information on how to care for residential lawns, commercial golf courses, athletic fields and any other space covered with Turfgrass.

Field day topics will include how to control weeds, insects and diseases, managing seed heads, heat and drought tolerance and an update on the UGA Turfgrass breeding programs.

A catered BBQ ribs and chicken lunch will be followed by product exhibits and demonstrations of the latest Turfgrass industry equipment. A self-guided research tour begins at 1:15 pm with at least half dozen programs to choose from. Guided tours will be offered in Spanish for Spanish-speaking attendees.

Registration is from 8:00 to 8:45 am followed by the welcome and presentations plus information regarding the available tours.  To view the Turfgrass research plots, the event is held outdoors, rain or shine, so dress appropriately and bring sunblock. The day concludes at 2:30 pm.

Pre-registration is required for the $65 individual fee ($25 for students) before July 17th. After that deadline, fees increase to $80 and $30. Receive a 10% discount for four or more registrants. The registration fee includes instruction, research tours, demonstrations and exhibits, Turfgrass research field day guide and lunch. You can register online at www.georgiaturf.com or via the Griffin location in person, by phone or fax, or snail mail.  Their telephone number is 770-229-3477. For more information, view or download the brochure at: http://caes2.caes.uga.edu/commodities/turfgrass/georgiaturf/FieldDay/index.html.  We also have a few brochures here in the office if you’d like to pick one up.

The event is sponsored by the UGA CAES, the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture, the Georgia Urban Ag Council, the Georgia Turfgrass Foundation Trust, the Georgia Golf Course Superintendents Association, the Georgia Golf Environment Foundation, the Georgia Sports Turf Managers Association and the Georgia Recreation and Park Association.

Please note: the field day is certified for private and commercial pesticide recertification credits in Georgia and neighboring states. A license number is required to receive the field day pesticide credits.

Also this summer, if you or someone you know enjoys the amusement parks in the area, buy the tickets on-line at a discount and support the Gilmer County 4-H Club.  Selling tickets to Six Flags and White Water has been a local 4-H fundraiser for nearly 10 years. Day passes and combo vouchers for season tickets including parking are available. For every ticket purchased through our partnership log in, the Gilmer County 4-H Club gets $1.00 so be sure to write down the following information; it is needed to access the site. A word of caution: the name, password and promo code are case sensitive. Our partnership link is https://sixflags.com/partnerlogin?m=32824 and the name is:  GilmerOG and the password is:  SixFlags10 and the promo code is:  gilmer4h and if you need more information, call the Gilmer County UGA Extension office at 706-635-4426.

FYN Interviews Rebbeca Yardley on Georgia’s 2018 Sine Die – Last Day of Legislative Session

Politics, State & National

It’s Sine Die day, that means it’s the last day of the 2018 Legislative Session! Interviews First Vice Chairman of Georgia Congress 9th District GOP Rebecca Yardley on the experience and what to expect from the Georgia Capitol today!

 

Widespread Flu in Georgia – Protect Yourself and Prevent the Spread of Flu

Health

Become A Sponsor For The Christmas Clash Presented By Team FYN Sports

Featured

Team FYN Sports will be broadcasting live the Blue Ridge Christmas Clash. Sponsorship opportunities are still available. Support your local youth and sports and market your company at the same time. Contact us now @ MarketMe@FetchYourNews.com or 706.276.6397

No. 21 Women’s Basketball Overcomes Slow Start for 70-65 WinOver Lakers

Team FYN Sports, University of North Georgia

MORROW, Ga. – Trailing by 13 early, the No. 21 University of North Georgia women’s basketball team fought all the way back and hung on late for a 70-65 win over Clayton State Monday night at The Loch. The Nighthawks have won 11 straight games and are two wins away from clinching a spot in the Peach Belt Conference tournament.

The Lakers jumped out to 12-3 lead in the first four minutes and extended that lead to 20-7 before the Nighthawks started chipping away. UNG cut the lead to just one at the half for a 34-33 score after two quarters.

North Georgia took its first lead of the night with 6:06 to play in the third period, 37-36, but the Lakers stretched their lead back out to six through the third. The Nighthawks went on to outscore Clayton State, 25-14, in the final period to claim the road win.

Amber Skidgel came alive in the fourth quarter to lead the Nighthawks in scoring with 20 points on 7-of-13 shooting, including three baskets from distance.

NOTES
Julie McKie scored 12 points, all of which came from the free throw line. For the Lakers, Abreylin Rackley led the way with 18 points, 12 of which came from behind the arc.

– Only three other times has North Georgia had a winning streak go 11 games or longer since the 2001-02 season, including two 15-game winning streaks.

– UNG went 30-of-36 from the free throw line in the game. The 30 made free throws ties the fifth-most made free throws in a single game in the NCAA era.

NEXT UP
The Nighthawks will finish a three games in five days stretch with a home game against Columbus State on Wednesday. The game will tip off at 5:30 p.m. and will also serve as Faculty Appreciation Night.

Sports talk Thursday with Lauren Hunter

All of TeamFYNSports, Featured Stories, Sports

About five years ago I told my dad, who is one of my biggest fans but also one of the most blunt people you’ll ever meet, that I wanted to be the first female head coach in the NFL.

“You can’t do that, Lauren,” he said.

“Why?” I argued.

I was expecting some drawn-out response about how I didn’t know enough about football.

“Because you can’t go in the men’s locker room,” he said flatly.

Ah, I hadn’t thought of that.

That was my senior year of high school, and never did I think I would be where I am now.

I grew up an UGA fan; my grandad attended college there in the ’60s and the red and black passed down into my veins. I learned to spell Georgia by chanting the fight song in my head (I still do subconsciously whenever I have to write it out!) I had an UGA cheerleader outfit and one of my baby pictures has me holding a stuffed bulldog. One of my nana’s fondest memories is of dancing around the living room with me as an infant when Georgia scored a big touchdown against Georgia Tech. I’ve never considered myself athletic, but I believe I owe a lot of my passion for sports to Papa Skip and Nana.

Papa Skip, Nana, my momma and I at the Georgia v. Florida game in 2017

Flash forward a few years and the first time I stepped foot on a sideline was as a cheerleader for the 8th grade Mill Creek rec football league. Cheerleading was not for me, and within a year I traded in pom poms for a six-foot flag pole as a member of the Mill Creek High School Colorguard.

In high school I lived for Friday night lights, and I have many fond memories of screaming myself hoarse for the Hawks while in the stands with the marching band. It was a well-known fact that I was the most spirited person in the band when it came to football, and while my coach would be yelling at me to pay attention during our warm-ups I’d be busy trying to figure out how much yardage we’d gotten from the last pass.

I guess my fellow classmates took note of my love for the game as well, because they voted me their Homecoming Queen my senior year. That is still one of my all-time favorite memories from high school- hearing my name called while standing on the 50 surrounded by family and friends.

My senior year of high school I was elected Homecoming Queen. This was the moment after my name was called. Look at my dad’s face!

I graduated from Mill Creek in 2015 but I had a hard time staying away from Markham Field. The University of North Georgia doesn’t have a football team, and Mill Creek decided to get really good the year after I left (this was the fall of 2015, the year they got knocked out by Colquitt County one round before the state championship.)

In the spring of 2016 I heard of an opportunity to work for the Gwinnett Braves, Triple-A minor league affiliate for the Atlanta Braves. Needing a summer job but hoping to avoid retail, I took it. I spent the next two summers as a Guest Relations Representative scanning tickets and welcoming fans. In addition to my already-sound knowledge of football, I learned all I could about America’s favorite pastime and a new love was born.

I spent one more summer at Coolray Field before graduating college, and this time it was as a member of the Promotional Team. That may be the most fun I ever had at work. Our team set up the on-field promotional games, signed up contestants, sold 50/50 raffle tickets and overall worked to make sure people had a good time. I certainly did- the memories I made with my team that year will forever be some of my favorites.

For a while I told people that I wasn’t interested in sports journalism, but the Lord as he fortunately often does had other plans. I got the opportunity to intern with the UNG Athletic Department my senior year of college, and I left Gwinnett County to plant some roots in the North Georgia mountains.

I worked for the Gwinnett Braves (now Gwinnett Stripers) for three seasons. Here I’m in my third season as a member of the Promo Team.

Two months ago I still wasn’t certain that I’d ever work in sports again, but when baseball started back up I knew I couldn’t live without it. I was fortunate enough to find an opportunity to apply with FetchYourNews.com, and even more fortunate to get an offer. And here we are.

I don’t tell you all this to brag on my accomplishments or give you some long-winded biography. I want to be just as much a part of your community as you all are now a part of my daily life. When I come to your sideline I want to know each of you and each of you know me. Part of being a great sports reporter is establishing a relationship with your team and community. Part of that relationship includes establishing trust, and how can you can trust someone if you don’t even know them?

One of the biggest reasons I keep working in sports is because of the the communities they create and the people I get to meet. There’s something about having a team to rally around that gets inside of you and never leaves. The people I have met so far and the connections I have made are priceless and will forever be a part of who I am and a big reason for why I do what I do.

So here’s to the journey ahead, and here’s to memories that are yet to be made and the relationships yet to be formed. I can’t wait North Georgia!

Lauren Hunter

New JROTC and Science facility coming to Lumpkin County High School

Community, News

DAHLONEGA, GA

The Lumpkin County Board of Education reviewed preliminary blueprints of the new JROTC and Science facility during the monthly Work Session on Monday, August 13.

Representatives from RLR Architects and Carroll Daniel Construction presented drawings for the proposed facility, which will replace the temporary trailers currently used for JROTC purposes. Dewayne Roof, with RLR Architects, explained that the ROTC building will be two-stories tall, equipped with elevator and staircase access. Entry to the building will be located near the high school, and a weather canopy will cover the walkway between the two entrances.  

The first level will contain two ROTC classrooms with a shared office, observation windows and a restroom. It will also have a centralized walk-through uniform storage area and laundry area. Lumpkin County High School Logistics Specialist, Steve Hawk, said the central location and design of the uniform storage will provide easy access to uniforms, as well as simplifying the overall process. There will also be separate male/female dressing rooms, complete with restrooms, and a supply storage room with roll up doors large enough for vehicle unloading.

After seeing the ground-floor layout, Hawk expressed his gratitude to the board and the design team, “I’m really impressed with the drawings. Anything we’ve suggested, they’ve put in there…after 15 years of working out of trailers, it’s a great idea.”

The second level will contain the armory storage area, will also feature what JROTC Senior Army Instructor, Jeff Moran, described as “a fifteen fifteen lane, state of the art, electronic rifle range” that will be something that they can, “add and develop not just excellent, but championship shooters.” An electronic equipment storage room and multipurpose room will also be located on the second floor. The roof will provide access to a two-story rappelling wall, complete with a cushioned landing located area at its base. Access to the rappelling wall will be secured from non ROTC students. The science building will a single-story building containing science classrooms and storage. 

Lumpkin County JROTC Army Instructor, Ron Fugate, stated that he did know know of any other high school in Georgia that was equipped with an electronic rifle range; he also explained that it would be the “latest and greatest” in the marksmanship program; he too, expressed deep gratitude.

Lumpkin County High School Superintendent, Dr. Robert Brown, estimated the cost of the project to be around 3.2 to 3.4 million dollars for the total cost, “we will benefit $600,000 for the actual construction on the facility. The rest will be “local commitment and SPLOST funding,” Brown explained.

The construction on the project is estimated for November 2018.

 

FetchYourNews.com attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month for ad server. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and has between 15,000 to 60,000 per week Facebook page reach. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or visit advertise@FetchYourNews.com

 

Japanese Knotweed

Outdoors

By:  Eddie Ayers, County Extension Agent

Driving around the area, I have been seeing a plant that has become a problem in both Gilmer and Fannin Counties.  The weed I’m talking about is Japanese knotweed, commonly known as crimson beauty, Mexican bamboo, or Japanese fleece flower.  It was probably introduced to the U.S. as an ornamental and a plant that has flowers that bees love. It’s fairly easy to spot as it has been growing in large patches all over the area.  The leaves are alternate, 6 in. (15.2 cm) long, 3-4 in. (7.6-10 cm) wide, and are broadly-ovate or heart shaped. Flowering occurs in late summer when small, greenish-white flowers develop in long panicles in the axils of the leaves.

This native of Japan was initially useful for erosion control, as an ornamental, and for landscape screening.  It spreads quickly to form dense thickets that can alter natural ecosystems or interfere with landscaping. It is a semi-woody, bushy perennial and a member of the Polygonaceae (Knotweed) family.  Another fact about the plant is that the stem is hollow. Knotweed spreads rapidly from stout long rhizomes. Seeds are distributed by water in floodplains, transported with fill dirt, and to a lesser extent are wind-blown. Populations escaped from neglected gardens, and discarded cuttings are common methods of distribution. Once established, populations are quite persistent and can out-compete existing vegetation.

Japanese knotweed can tolerate a variety of adverse conditions including full shade, high temperatures, high salinity, and drought. It is found near water sources, in low-lying areas, waste places, utility rights of way, and around old home sites. It can quickly become an invasive pest in natural areas after escaping from cultivated gardens. It poses a significant threat to riparian areas, where it can survive severe floods. It is rapidly colonizing scoured shores and islands.

Controlling this invasive fast growing plant is very difficult.  One method that is used is grubbing. This method is appropriate for small initial populations or environmentally sensitive areas where herbicides cannot be used. Using a digging tool, remove the entire plant including all roots and runners. Juvenile plants can be hand-pulled.  Any portions of the root system not removed will potentially resprout. All plant parts, including mature fruit, should be bagged and disposed of in a trash dumpster to prevent re-establishment.

There are several herbicides that can be used, but it takes some work for them to be effective.  One treatment method is the cut stump treatment. Use this method in areas where plants are established within or around non-target plants. Cut the stem 2 inches above ground level.  Immediately apply a 20% solution of glyphosate or a 10% solution of Arsenal AC, Polaris AC or Imazapyr 4SL and water to the cross-section of the stem. A subsequent foliar application may be required to control new seedlings and resprouts.

The other spray method is foliar spraying the plants.  Use this method to control large populations. It may be necessary to precede foliar applications with stump treatments to reduce the risk of damaging non-target species.  Apply a 1% solution of glyphosate or 20%Garlon4 and water to thoroughly wet all foliage. Do not apply so heavily that herbicides will drip off leaves. The ideal time to spray is after surrounding vegetation has become dormant (October-November) to avoid affecting non-target species.  A 0.5% non-ionic surfactant is recommended in order to penetrate the leaf cuticle.

For more information, contact me in the Gilmer County UGA Extension office.

Senator Steve Gooch Honors City of Dahlonega

State & National

ATLANTA (January 29, 2018) | Senator Steve Gooch (R – Dahlonega) is pleased to announce Monday, January 29, 2018, as Dahlonega Day at the state Capitol with Senate Resolution 590.

“Dahlonega is the gateway to North Georgia and I am grateful to be able to share my home with the rest of my colleagues,” said Sen. Gooch. “This year marks the 60th anniversary of Dahlonega and Lumpkin County citizens delivering gold, by wagon, for the installation of the state Capitol building’s gold dome. I could not be more proud to have representatives from our local community here today to celebrate this honor.”

The City of Dahlonega is a small city in northern Georgia founded in 1832. Dahlonega was the site of the first major U.S. gold rush and now is commonly referred to as the ‘Gold City’. The city sits at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and is surrounded by many natural elements. Dahlonega is the county seat of Lumpkin County. In addition to its history of gold mining, the city of Dahlonega is also known as the Heart of Georgia Wine Country, with six wineries and nine winery tasting rooms.

 

Flash Flood Watch for North Georgia

News

This information is from the National Weather Service. To see the full NWS Radar Image for Georgia please follow the link.

The remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy will push east through the weekend. Expect the moisture associated with TS Cindy to interact with a boundary that will move south across the region through Saturday night. Given the already saturated soils and plentiful moisture expected with this front, we may see more flooding issues, especially across north GA.

Over the past 24 hours, we have observed 1-3 inches of rainfall, mainly north of I-20.  This will be the main area of concern in terms of flooding potential.

WHAT:

Flash Flood Watch is in effect across north GA (along and north of I-20).


WHEN:

From 2 PM this afternoon through 8 PM Saturday evening.

IMPACTS:

An additional 1-2 inches with locally higher amounts is possible, potentially within the metro Atlanta area and points north and west.  This may lead to flooding in low lying and flood prone areas, especially in urban areas and along Interstate 20. In addition, creeks, streams and rivers may overflow their banks.

 

Who is Running High Speed Fiber Optic Cable through North GA and Why?

Featured, News

Part One:
Have you been wondering what they are doing along the train tracks in North Ga? Have you noticed the big spools near the tracks? Why are they digging trenches along these rail road tracks? The answer: They are installing high speed fiber optic cable. But who is doing this and what is their reasoning?
#BKP gives us information about who is doing this and where in this video. He will tell us more about who and why they are doing this in part two.

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